Heavy: An American Memoir

Tuesday, 30 October 2018, 1:31 | Uncategorized | 394 Views


• Author :Kiese Laymon
• Pages :
256 Sheets
• ISBN-10 :
1501125656
• ISBN-13 :9781501125652
• Release :
October 16, 2018
• Publisher :
Scribner

⊕ Plot Summary : “*Longlisted for the Andrew Carnegie honour and Kirkus Prize Finalist* during this powerful and provocative memoir, genre-bending writer and author Kiese Laymon explores what the load of a period of time of secrets, lies, and deception will to a black body, a black family, and a nation teetering on the brink of ethical collapse. Kiese Laymon could be a fearless author. In his essays, personal stories mix with piercing intellect to replicate each on the state of yankee society and on his experiences with abuse, that conjure conflicted feelings of shame, joy, confusion and humiliation. Laymon invitations United States to think about the implications of growing up in an exceedingly nation entirely dependent on progress nonetheless entirely fair within the untidy work of reckoning with wherever we’ve been.

In Heavy, Laymon writes eloquently and honestly regarding growing up a hard-headed black son to a sophisticated and sensible black mother in Jackson, Mississippi. From his early experiences of sexual violence, to his suspension from school, to his trek to the big apple as a young school prof, Laymon charts his advanced relationship together with his mother, gran, anorexia, obesity, sex, writing, and ultimately gambling. By making an attempt to call secrets and lies he and his mother spent a period of time avoiding, Laymon asks himself, his mother, his nation, and United States to confront the alarming chance that few during this nation truly acumen to responsibly love, and even fewer need to measure beneath the load of truly turning into free. a private narrative that illuminates national failures, serious is insubordinate nonetheless vulnerable, Associate in Nursing perceptive, typically humorous exploration of weight, identity, art, friendship, and family that begins with a confusing childhood—and continues through twenty-five years of haunting implosions and long reverberations.”


⊗ Author Profile

“Kiese Laymon may be a black southern author, born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi. Laymon attended Millsaps faculty and Jackson State University before graduating from Oberlin faculty. He attained associate Master of Fine Arts in Fiction from IN University. Laymon is presently the Ottilie Schillig academician of English and artistic Writing at the University of Mississippi. He served because the Distinguished prof of prose at the University of Iowa in Fall 2017. Laymon is that the author of the novel, division and a set of essays, a way to Slowly Kill Yourself et al in America, the united kingdom edition discharged in 2016.

Laymon has written essays, stories and reviews for varied publications as well as Esquire, McSweeneys, the big apple Times, ESPN the Magazine, Colorlines, NPR, LitHub, The l. a. Times, The Guardian, PEN Journal, Fader, Oxford yank, the simplest yank Series, Ebony, Travel and Leisure, Paris Review and Guernica. He has 2 books forthcoming, as well as a memoir referred to as significant expected in Oct 2018 and a completely unique, And So On, in 2019, each from Scribner.”


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Heavy

2018-10-16 | Social Science


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